Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

Below you'll find a compilation of answers to questions we commonly hear from customers. If you cannot find what you're looking for, please don't hesitate to contact us. We want you to have the information you need to get the final result you want.

  1. How long will it take for you to complete my order?

    Every job is different. Some jobs can be produced in minutes while some may take several days to complete. Let us know when you need your job completed and we'll let you know if it can be done. We go to great lengths to meet even your most demanding timelines.

  2. What is the best file format for submitting a document for printing?

    A PDF (Portable Document Format) is generally the preferred file format for submitting a document for printing as it works with virtually all professional printing and digital output devices. By design, a PDF file incorporates the information needed to maintain document consistency from system to system. Most other file formats such as Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Microsoft Word are easily converted to PDF format. The optimum PDF format is PDF/X-1a:2001.

  3. How well will what I see on my monitor match what I see on paper?

    The technology of design, layout and printing has come a long way to the point where much of the work is done in a WSYWIG (What You See Is What You Get) digital environment. However, there are sometimes noticeable differences in color calibration and spatial conformity from monitor to monitor and consequently from screen to print.

    The process for minimizing any variance begins with adjusting your monitor for optimal color and clarity according to the manufacturer's recommendations as outlined within its product manual or website. Doing this will alleviate a number of potential issues.

  4. What is a proof and why is it needed?

    A proof is a one-off copy of your printed document used for visual inspection to ensure that the layout and colors of your document are exactly how they are intended to be. A proof is made prior to sending the document to the press for final printing.

    Typically, we will produce a proof that will be sent to you online in PDF format or on printed paper, which can be either viewed in our store or delivered to you in person. For multiple-color jobs, we can produce a proof on our output device to show you how the different colors will appear on the final product.

    Your approval on the final proof is the best assurance you have that every aspect of our work and your own is correct, and that everything reads and appears the way you intended. Mistakes can and sometimes do happen. It benefits everyone if errors are caught in the proofing process rather than after the job is completed and delivered.

  5. What is the difference between coated and uncoated paper stock?

    Uncoated stock paper is comparatively porous and inexpensive, and is typically used for such applications as newspaper print and basic black-and-white copying. Coated stock, by contrast, is made of higher quality paper having a smooth glossy finish that works well for reproducing sharp text and vivid colors. It tends to be more expensive, however.

  6. What does "print ready" mean?

    In the digital age of printing, it means that an image file submitted for printing is ready to be transferred to the printing plates or sent to the print queue without any alterations.

  7. What are the most common sizes for brochures?

    Common brochure sizes are 8 1/2" x 11", 8 1/2" x14" and 11" x17".

  8. What are the types of bindings I can use for multi-page projects?

    Some of the common methods of binding books and other multi-page documents include:

    Perfect binding: Gluing the outside edges of the pages together to create a flat edge.

    Saddle-stitch binding: Using staples along the folds of the pages to bind them together.

    Spiral binding: Wires in a spiral form threaded through punched holes along the binding edge of the papers. Allows the document to lay open flatly.

    Plastic comb binding: Similar to spiral binding but using a tubular plastic piece with teeth that fit through rectangular holes punched into the binding edge.

    Three-ring binding: Holes are punched into the pages and fitted into a binder.

    Case binding: Sewing the pages together and then attaching them to a hard cover.